Media kit: One year on: World's most threatened uncontacted tribes

One year after photos of uncontacted Amazon Indians made headlines around the world, a new report from Survival International reveals the five uncontacted tribes most at risk of extinction.

Relevant links

  • “News – One year on: New report reveals five uncontacted tribes most at risk”

Map of some of the world’s uncontacted tribes (click for large .pdf)

Video clips

An abandoned communal house built by uncontacted Ayoreo-Totobiegosode Indians, Paraguay. (640×360 MPEG4 – please contact us for broadcast format)

Ayoreo-Totobiegosode man Porai, standing in front of cleared Chaco forest, Paraguay, speaks of their need to protect their forest for their uncontacted relatives, Paraguay. (640×360 MPEG4 – please contact us for broadcast format)

Ayoreo-Totobiegosode man Ojnai, standing in front of cleared Chaco forest, Paraguay, speaks of his sister still living uncontacted in the forest. (640×360 MPEG4 – please contact us for broadcast format)

Jorge, a Murunahua man from south-east Peru, speaks of first contact with loggers, and the ensuing disease. (640×360 MPEG4 – please contact us for broadcast format)

Extraordinary footage of the first contact with Korubo Indians of Brazil in 1996. (640×360 MPEG4 – please contact us for broadcast format)

 

Images

These images may be reproduced for press purposes only. Click on the thumbnails for a larger version. For all other uses, please contact Survival.

Photo of the uncontacted tribe photographed last year in the Brazilian Amazon, near the Peruvian border.

© Gleison Miranda/FUNAI


 

Photo of the uncontacted tribe photographed last year in the Brazilian Amazon, near the Peruvian border.

© Gleison Miranda/FUNAI


 

Hastily abandoned house of the Rio Pardo Indians, Brazil.

© FUNAI

 

Members of the Paraguayan Ayoreo-Totobiegosode group the moment they were contacted for the first time, in 2004.

© GAT/Survival


 

Members of the Paraguayan Ayoreo-Totobiegosode group on the day they were contacted for the first time, in 2004.

© GAT/Survival


 

FUNAI official José Carlos Meirelles holds arrows belonging to uncontacted Indians, Brazil.

© Essential Film & Television/Eduardo Passar


 

Crossed spears found on a path in northern Peru, in the region where oil company Perenco is working. Crossed spears are a common sign used by uncontacted Indians to warn outsiders to stay away.

© Marek Wolodzko/Survival


 

Uncontacted Mashco-Piro Indians spotted from the air, S.E.Peru, 2007.

© Heinz Plenge Pardo / Frankfurt Zoological Society


 

Uncontacted Indians’ fishing shelters spotted on river bank, S.E. Peru, 2008.

© C. Fagan


 

Uncontacted Mashco-Piro Indian woman spotted from the air, S.E.Peru, 2007.

© Heinz Plenge Pardo / Frankfurt Zoological Society


 

Satellite photo reveals illegal deforestation (circled) by Brazilian ranchers inside Totobiegosode territory, Paraguay.

© GAT/Survival


 

Awá men travel down a road cut by loggers.

© Uirá Garcia


 

Awá men hunting in the forest.

© Fiona Watson/Survival