Success: Peru acts to save uncontacted tribes 1 March 2011

"Global coverage of the newly-released photos has pushed the Peruvian government into action"
"Global coverage of the newly-released photos has pushed the Peruvian government into action"
© G. Miranda/FUNAI/Survival

Peru’s authorities have announced that they will work together with Brazil to stop loggers entering isolated Indians’ territory along the two countries’ joint border.

The move is the first success of Survival’s campaign to protect the uncontacted Indians of the Peru-Brazil border.

Global coverage of the newly-released photos made public last month has pushed the Peruvian government into action.

In a statement released February 2nd, Peru’s Foreign Ministry announced that they will ‘establish contact with Brazil’s FUNAI institute [Department of Indian Affairs]… to preserve these peoples and avoid the incursion of illegal loggers and the depredation of the Amazon.’

Last week Survival received a letter from the Peruvian Ambassador to the UK reafirming the government’s pledge to work towards protecting uncontacted tribes’ land from illegal loggers.

INDEPA, Peru’s government organization responsible for indigenous issues is yet to respond to Survival.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This is a really encouraging first step, let’s hope their declared intention turns into real action quickly.’

 

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